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Capones Island and Anawangin Cove: Jewels of Zambales

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Mother Nature has an eternal cycle of destruction and creation. A supermassive star, for example, explodes as a supernova. Its shock wave instigating the gas in a nearby nebula to start the cosmic activity that results to the birth of a new star. A forest consumed by wildfire during the hot summer months starts to regrow after the autumn rains bathe the lands. Corals, destroyed by ships landing on top of them, find new life on the steel hulk. In time, the wreck turns into a vibrant artificial reef.

We wanted to witness an actual, developing evidence of that cycle of death and rebirth during Holy Week 2014. That evidence was the aftermath of the cataclysmic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in Luzon, Philippines more than a decade ago. The eruption and the resulting ashfall and lahar swept away farms and houses, destroyed mountains and forests, snuffed out lives, destroyed infrastructure, dented the national economy, and even affected global weather.

However, in the years that followed, lands that were covered by Mt. Pinatubo’s ashfall became extremely fertile. Volcano tourism and scientific research at the tri-point of the provinces of Zambales, Tarlac, and Pampanga soared high. And undiscovered, barren coves began to take life, showing a new, gorgeous face of natural beauty.

Sweetie and I planned to see just how the volcano breathed life to these coves, namely the now-popular coves of Anawangin and Nagsasa. Of course, our adventure and learning wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the heart of it all—Mt. Pinatubo itself. Coming with us to experience the adventure were Sir Jigz Santiago, former Mt. Kanlaon head guide and now Canlaon City Kagawad, and his partner Ma’am April. If you go back to our earlier adventures, you may recognize them as the couple who went with us to Osmeña Peak in Dalaguete, Cebu a few years ago. You could thus call our trip an adventure-couple reunion with a tinge of a Holy Week holiday!

It was a good thing that Sir Jigz and Ma’am April were able to take a much earlier flight. After lining up for almost 5 hours, they were able to purchase bus tickets for all of us before we arrived. Had they’ve been booked in the same flight as ours or had they waited for us before buying tickets, we wouldn’t have been able to faithfully follow our itinerary. For that, we are forever grateful to them.

We left Manila at around 3:30 AM and arrived at Olongapo at 6:00 AM. Then we took another bus bound for San Antonio in Zambales.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

We skirted the beautiful “urbanized” coastline of Subic Bay where we saw fleets of giant ships, expansive harbors, and clean beaches filled with happy throngs of beachgoers in perfect harmony. Activity here, even in the early morning hours, is bustling.

As we left Subic and headed deeper into Southern Zambales, we saw the golden slopes of the majestic and massive Pundaquit mountain range.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

After an hour, we arrived at the quaint, lovely town of San Antonio. Check out their gorgeous town plaza!

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Knowing that it was going to be quite a long, tiring day, we headed down to San Antonio’s wet market where we found this large eatery. As what we always say, a good adventure starts with a good meal! Thus, we ordered a big, filling breakfast.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

As adventurers, we always make it a point to try out a region’s specialties. San Antonio’s specialty is pancit palabok, a delicious salty-sour Filipino-Chinese dish that consists of thin rice noodles with a special shrimp sauce poured on it. The dish is then topped with chopped spring onions, slices of eggs, and pork rind bits.

Pancit palabok is found everywhere in the Philippines, but the defining characteristic of San Antonio’s palabok is its very generous serving of shrimp sauce.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

After a heavy breakfast, we headed into the wet market proper to buy ingredients for our meals. It is imperative that you purchase ingredients or packed meals in San Antonio because there are no restaurants, carenderias, or eateries in the hidden coves of Zambales.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

After shopping for ingredients, we headed out to the tourism desk just beside the municipal hall for registration. The tourism officers secured the tricycle and island hopping arrangements for us.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

We were actually pleasantly surprised when we learned that our tricycle driver was a lithe, lively dudette rather than a burly dude. Now, we don’t have anything against women drivers, but it’s not every day that you can see female tricycle drivers!

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

On the way to Pundaquit Beach, which involved a 30-minute tricycle ride, we were treated to a rich plethora of sights. A nice highlight of the ride was passing by a resort of some sort that is established right in the middle of a river. The resort seemingly shares the same space with farmers who use the river for agricultural purposes.

Meanwhile, the massive Pundaquit mountain range loomed ahead, obscuring the view of the secret coves, which are located behind that range.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Pundaquit Beach

At last, we arrived at Barangay Pundaquit, which meant that the real adventure was about to start! The most prominent thing we noticed is that the Barangay is chock-full of beach resorts!

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

We stopped at Pundaquit Beach, a public beach and a staging point for island hopping tours around the bay. Sans the noise and the throngs of tourists, this place was the perfect definition of idyllic. Just check the photo below: that’s a gorgeous scene of sky, mountain, and sea!

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

During high tide, the sea fills up this nice sandy pool. Local kids usually take a dip here during searing days such as today.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

We did say searing, yes? Due to global warming, our summers of late have been extremely scorching. To cool off during the hot morning, we treated ourselves to generous servings of halo-halo, a popular Filipino beverage/dessert made of jellies, pieces of kaong, custard, pinipig crisps, and other ingredients mixed in shaved ice and milk! No soft drink, juice, or beverage can ever come to the “refreshing power” of a good halo-halo!

Aside from the usual ingredients, Pundaquit’s halo-halo has an additional ingredient—sweet, nutty caramel syrup that stuck to our taste buds.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Because it was Holy Week (Good Friday, to be specific), Pundaquit beach was quite crowded with locals and visitors who want to take a break from the chaotic city life and simply take a much-needed vacation to recharge themselves. The sand that covers Pundaquit Beach is exquisite, clean, and fine, but there was really something peculiar about it. We’ll tell you about that sand in our next post.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Since there were only four of us, we were assigned to a small, roofless boat. Later, during the cruise, we told ourselves, “We should have gotten a bigger boat.” Hehe! You’ll know why as you read this blog post.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Starting with a loud guttural growl, the boat’s engine sputtered to life. We launched off from Pundaquit beach to head to our first destination Islas de Punta Capones, or, in short, Capones Island.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Capones Island

Our boat sliced through the waves as we approached Capones Island. Capones Island is an oversized shoe-shaped rock outcropping that juts out of the water. Even from afar, we could already see the magnificent limestone cliffs that make up most of the island’s perimeter.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales
(Photo credit: Jigz Santiago)

A sandy shore faces the mainland, and we could see throngs of visitors enjoying the sand and sea. The high rocky cliff forms a protective wall that embraces the beach. More than that, you already know what went through our minds, considering we are rock climbers. Yes, that rock face is a very good candidate for bolting.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales
(Photo credit: Jigz Santiago)

Gorgeous limestone cliffs! We weren’t able to take a closer look at these marvelous walls. However, if the water right beneath it is deep enough, these rock faces may be excellent routes for deep water soloing, a style of non-roped climbing wherein the climber falls in the water in case he or she falls.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales
(Photo credit: Jigz Santiago)

We docked at the south part of Capones Island, which is the entry point to the island’s highlight, the ruins of the Capones Island Lighthouse. Huge rocks embraced by rock cliffs compose the southern shore.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Sadly, the island’s natural beauty up close was blemished by this ugly pile of garbage. Sad sights like these always never fail to elicit a tired, exasperated sigh from us. Why do people throw trash in paradise? Are they just too lazy to clean up after themselves?

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

We climbed up the rocky trail that led to the lighthouse. The day was immensely hot, and the short, easy climb rapidly drained our strength. We should have brought an umbrella.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

All things considered, however, it was a very easy climb. Concrete and stone steps carved on the rock faces made the trek completely manageable even for old folks.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Along the way, we passed by this old stone bridge which, during its time, doubled as a bunker of some sort.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

A well-established dirt trail led to the lighthouse, which was quite visible when we reached the top of the flight of rock steps. Check out the grass; the onslaught of salty moisture and the sun’s extreme heat made them wither.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

The trail continued through a lightly wooded area, much to our relief. A few minutes later, we entered through an old, eerie gate that was very reminiscent of gates in haunted-house flicks. We didn’t feel any sense of dread as we passed through the gate and into the compound, but we’re pretty sure that the experience would be quite, well, scary at night.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

We arrived at the Capones Island Lighthouse, which is, in fact, a historic lighthouse. This lighthouse once guided vessels coming from the north towards Subic Bay, Corregidor Island, or Manila Bay. It was built and became operational sometime in the late 1890s.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

From the facility’s veranda, one can see a beautiful, encompassing view of the expanse of the West Philippine Sea. We imagine that during the lighthouse’s heyday, lonely crew members would gather around here, chat with each other, play a guitar, share glasses of tuba (coconut wine), and appreciate the view during their break.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Stepping into the lighthouse’s lower levels was like stepping back in time. Sometime in the early 20th century, the Capones Lighthouse was abandoned. Years ago, in compliance with the Philippine Coast Guard’s Maritime Safety protocol, the tower was renovated and a solar-powered light was installed to replace the old lamp-and-lantern assembly. The rest of the station was left to deteriorate.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

The top of the 65-foot lighthouse can be accessed by a rusty spiral ladder that shakes with each step and a series of equally rusty ladders.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

After a short climb, we arrived at the heart of the lighthouse, a set of rotating lamps that could send beams of bright lights to guide ships and boats. We’re not sure if the lamps are still functional.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

I climbed at the very top of the lighthouse, which turned out to be an excellent vantage point. Below the main lighthouse are the severely deteriorated keeper’s house and miscellaneous buildings, a deep well, and a non-functional water tank. Most of the rusting station is overgrown by plants.

According to my research, the Environmental Protection of Asia Foundation was supposed to renovate and convert the lighthouse into a marine conservation research center. Until now, since the agreement was signed in 2004, no visible development is evident.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Light woods cover one side of the island. We wouldn’t be surprised if this patch of vegetation would be filled with snakes, lizards, and other reptiles.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Now, that’s a completely stunning view of a peninsula, the sky, and the vast expanse of the azure West Philippine Sea. We would gladly wake up to a view like this every day!

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

After half an hour, we descended from the lighthouse and headed towards the island’s prominent peninsula. Check out the grass; they’re golden in color! Yes, they are almost hay-like in appearance. A wonder of nature, don’t you agree?

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Laid out in front of us is the splendor of Zambales! And personally, the beauty of the place becomes even better when I’m together with my Sweetie! Hehehe!

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales
(Photo credit: Jigz Santiago)

After taking a couple of photos, we went back to our boat. Check out the rocks that line up the shore; they almost look like the pebbles of Mabua Pebble Beach in Surigao City.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Anawangin Cove

After a satisfying hour-long visit in Capones Island, we were ready to cruise to our next destination. The 30-minute cruise to Anawangin Cove was unexpectedly choppy despite the calm, windless weather.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

As we skirted Pundaquit’s coastline, we witnessed gorgeous mountains that abruptly ended in massive sea cliffs. Looking at the mountains, you might think that the bare slopes are the results of deforestation. Nope, these are all natural; the slopes are made up of either grasslands or loose soil.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

We didn’t expect it! Just like a stage curtain, we saw this beautiful sandy cove half an hour later. The cove was nestled in the loving embrace of a protective range of high, grass-covered mountains. We have arrived at the much touted Anawangin Cove.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

As we approached the shore of Anawangin Cove, we saw massive numbers of vacationers and beachgoers, all excited for a weekend of cool water, relaxing sea breeze, and great fun with friends and family. We didn’t expect that such a secluded cove could be so crowded.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Just check out the photo below. Now, that’s what we call a beach! Powdery white sand, aquamarine waters, and encompassing mountains!

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

But like any other place that attracts tourists or has a huge potential as a tourist destination, Anawangin Cove has become commercialized in no time at all. Check out the rates; they’re quite high considering that the cove is technically a public beach.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Most vacationers who wish to stay overnight in Anawangin Cove bring and pitch tents rather than rent a cottage. Beachgoers who don’t have tents can rent one at an affordable price. However, tent rental is limited in number, so we strongly advise bringing your own tent.

When we arrived at Anawangin Cove, there were already hundreds of tents and even more vacationers. We understand that these places get heavily crowded during Holy Week, but we never expected that such a remote, secluded area could be THAT crowded.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

A large forest of pine-like Agoho trees provides shade to give beachgoers respite from the unrelenting, punishing summer sun. Behind this forest is a marsh that provides sea birds with plenty of critters for food.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

It didn’t take long before we decided that Anawangin Cove was just too crowded for our taste. So, we boarded our small boat and headed out to the much-farther and, hopefully, less crowded Nagsasa Cove.

It was one of the most intense 45-minute boat ride in our lives. You see, the waves were quite massive even though we were close to shore; that’s not surprising since we were sailing in open water. But we still held on to the boat until our knuckles turned white. Wave after wave battered our small boat, and we were sure that our vessel would disintegrate any moment. At times, we flew right over a wave’s crest; in other times, we huddled in fear as we surfed down deep troughs.

Our young and experienced boatman, however, was not even slightly perturbed!

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Along the way, we were treated to a spectacular display of immense sea cliffs and sea caves, clear testaments that speak volumes of just how magnificent, powerful, and pitiless Mother Nature is.

Note: Due to the cold water and the warm air, our camera lens fogged during the cruise. We weren’t able to take clear photos of the sea cliffs. But don’t worry, they will be featured in the next article.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Finally, after almost an hour, we turned right towards a well-protected, secluded bay which fronted a sandy shore. At last, after a hair-raising, harrowing, wet boat ride, we reached Nagsasa Cove, our destination for the day.

Island Hopping in Capones Island and Annawangin Cove in Zambales

Go to the next post for details of our stay in the picturesque Nagsasa Cove.
(Cover photo by Jigz Santiago)

Pinoy Travel Bloggers Blog Carnival Entry

This is our entry to Pinoy Travel Bloggers Blog Carnival for the month of May 2014 entitled, “Luzon Lovapalooza” hosted by Mervin of the award-winning travel blog Pinoy Adventurista.

 

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About Adrenaline Romance

Rock climbers. Mountaineers. Sweethearts on adventure. Adrenaline Romance is a photoblog that belongs to a loving couple who has an eternal lust for adventure. The blog contains experiences, tips, itineraries, and other useful information regarding adventuring in the Philippines and beyond.

36 comments on “Capones Island and Anawangin Cove: Jewels of Zambales

  1. This story is like Matrix Trilogy (Nagsasa, Capones, and Anawangin). I must say the intro on how creation and destruction create new sites to lay eyes on really got me goin’ until the last word.

    The photos are equally engaging that I would not want to jump to the next but walk on each.

    You made me reminisce the good old days I and my hiking buddies shared in each of the three places mentioned earlier.

    • Hi Sony,

      Thank you so much for visiting, and thank you for the compliment. Yes, Capones Island and Anawangin Cove are spectacular paradises.

      Actually, we originally planned to trek from San Antonio to both Anawangin and Nagsasa Coves, traversing the Pundaquit range. But then, we would lose a lot of time, and we still had to visit Mt. Pinatubo. So we decided to just take the island hopping service.

  2. Beautiful and gorgeous sceneries. That Anawangin Cove was much too much crowded. I wouldn’t want to camp there either.

    • Hi Meylou,

      Thank you! Zambales is truly spectacular! Wait till you see the next post about Nagsasa Cove and the sea cliffs. They’re awesome!

      Anawangin Cove was indeed crowded, but that’s because it was Holy Week when we went there. In normal days, we’re pretty sure it won’t be as crowded as what you saw in the photos.

      Nevertheless, more people go to Anawangin Cove than Nagsasa Cove because the former is nearer to Pundaquit Beach. In fact, from Anawangin, it took us almost an hour to reach Nagsasa.

      P.S. You are our foremost commenter. If ever we’ll have Adrenaline Romance souvenirs, we’ll give you some for free! Hehehe!

  3. Oh my – that trash picture is quite eye-opening!

  4. Salamat po sa pagbisita “Adrenaline Romance”. Hope you guys will come back again and relay your great experience to friends, work mates and so on and so forth.

    Thank you for sharing your posts. Great blog po.

    Thank you once again.”

  5. . .hello po!…good am/eve po mga maam and sir na gustong bumusita sa camara, capones, anawangin, talisayin, or nagsasa cove…direct contact po kami we offer package and non package, trekking/hikking is also available and van for rents…

    ANAWANGIN COVE PACKAGE:
    4-8 PERSONS – 550 perhead
    9-10 ABOVE – 500 perhead

    NAGSASA COVE PACKAGE:
    4-8 PERSONS – 750 perhead
    9-10 ABOVE – 700 perhead

    INCLUSIONS:
    boat with island hopping(capones), tent, entrance, tubig, yelo, bonfire, uling…

    For more questions and inquiries pls. Call or text us at: 09272684714
    salamat po.

  6. sir. great blog! my friends and i are planning to go there soon. would you kindly advise rates for the boat ride and your accommodations while you stayed there? salamat!

    • Hi Judy,

      Thank you for visiting our blog.

      As for your inquiry, we recommend going to the Tourist Info Desk in front of the San Antonio Market. They’ll help you acquire your boat.

      For accommodations, you need to rent or bring a tent because there are no rental rooms in Anawangin ang Nagsasa Coves.

      For more tips, click this link and scroll down to the Budget, Itinerary, and Tips section.

  7. sir/mam (adrenalin romance):
    my friends and i were settled to go there on 21 March 2015. Is there a place where we can leave our vehicles?

    • Hi Lukring,

      We believe you can park them at the Municipal Hall. Just ask for permission from the barangay tanods or policemen there.

      You can also probably park your vehicle in Pundaquit. There are locals there whose properties are large enough to allow parking. You may have to pay a small fee, though.

      Hope this helps.

  8. Just wanted to ask if there are any island in Pundaquit where I can go through?

  9. Hi ! I just wanna thank the qriter of this blog. We just visited anawangin and capones last week and it was amazing. Your blog was one of our references so i have to say good job for the writer!

    Btw, i created a travel video of our anawangin-capones trip and uploaded it in youtube! You might want to link it here for you readers’ more visual preference. Thanks! It would be a pleasure! Have a good day! ! 😊 just email me for the link of the video: santosmigueljuan@gmail.com

  10. Hi sweet couple Gian and Sheila,

    Super thank you for this informative, interesting and exciting blog. This will be my reference for my Anawangin and Capones adventure this coming Nov28-29.

    Kudos to both of you!

  11. TEAM BUILDING BEST LOCATION! Experience affordable Anawangin Cove & Nagsasa Cove tours with island hopping, trekking, boat transfer and camping supply starting @P599/pax.- Cut agency/coordinator rates! DIRECT RESORT OWNERS 09298422127

  12. Hello guys..
    Libre ang magtanong..wanna know more about cheap and negotiable Island hopping rates from Pundaquit to:

    1. Camara Island
    2. Capones Island
    3. Anawangin Cove
    3. Nagsasa Cove

    I-pm kami sa 0929 561 290 (Nanay Lilia)
    Did you want stress-free travel?
    We can arrange your stuff like ice, cooler, distilled water, tent, cooking utensils, etc. Let us know your concerns, and we are here!

  13. Package tour Promos for

    Anawangin-Capones package
    4-8 pax =550/head
    9-above = 500/head
    Nagsasa package
    4-8 pax = 650/head
    9-above = 600/head
    Nagsasa-Anawangin-capones package
    4-8 pax = 750/head
    9-above = 700/head
    Silanguin packages
    750/head
    Inclusions
    -Boat
    -Entrance
    -Tent
    -water
    -Ice
    -bonfire
    -cooler
    -Cooking utensils
    Contact us @ 09172022692/09995959623 and look for Dinzel

  14. Hi there, can you share some travel tips from Mt. Pinatubo to Anawangin & Nagsasa Coves? We’re planning to go there by July.

  15. […] Capones Island and Anawangin Cove: Jewels of Zambales … – Hi Sony, Thank you so much for visiting, and thank you for the compliment. Yes, Capones Island and Anawangin Cove are spectacular paradises. Actually, we … […]

  16. hello, pwede po humingi ng advise if magkano po magiging expense po naming pag pumunta dyan din po sa pinuntahan nyo 2 lang po kame?

  17. PTPA…

    Hello every’one!…

    Summer is approaching knowing Filipinos love to travel, different adventure, camping, visit the most beautiful beach in the country…

    Here we are offering the best package we have for your ideal vacation.

    Anawangin package w/o van.

    * 4-8 pax – 550 per head
    * 9 above – 500 per head

    Talisayin package w/o van.

    * 4-8 pax – 700 per head
    * 9 above – 600 per head

    Nagsasa package w/o van.
    * 4-8 pax – 750 per head
    * 9 above – 700 per head

    Inclusions:
    Boat
    Tent
    Entrance fee ( camping site )
    Drinking water
    Ice
    Bonfire
    Charcoal
    Cooler
    Utensils and cook wares

    Exclusion:
    Entrance fee ( before pundakit )
    Shower in pundakit
    Parking fee ( if you have a car )

    Anawangin package with van.
    *min. of 10 pax – 1300 per head

    Talisayin package with van.
    *min. of 10 pax – 1400 per head

    Nagsasa package with van.
    *min. of 10 pax – 1500 per head

    Inclusions:
    Van
    Tollgate fee
    Gas
    Parking
    Boat
    Tent
    Entrance fee ( camping site )
    Drinking water
    Ice
    Bonfire
    Charcoal
    Cooler
    Utensils and cook wares

    Exclusions:
    Entrance fee ( before pundakit )
    Shower in pundakit

    Call us today and get more discount, freebies optional package and tours like food package, trekking from pundakit to anawangin…

    Don’t just sit and read this… Call us for your reservation now @ 09272684714

    Direct contact from pundakit

    Thank you (^_^)…

  18. PTPA…

    Hello travelers! if you are looking for a trusted agency that will accommodate you with your Anawangin or Nagsasa trip. I would love to present to you our agency with a friendly budget deals.

    Anawangin Package with Van:

    Exclusive Rate:
    11 person and up – 1 299 per head
    10 person-1399 per head
    9 person- 1490 per head
    8 person- 1600 per head
    7 person-1 750 per head

    Anawangin Package with Van and Meals (All-In)
    Exclusive Rate:
    11 person and up – 1 699 per head
    10 person-1799 per head
    9 person- 1890 per head
    8 person- 2000 per head
    7 person- 2150 per head

    We also offers door to door service for less hassle trip:
    (How this works?) Simple, we will pick you and drop you in front of your house or location near you with affordable charges.

    Package includes:
    -Manila-Zambales-Manila via Hi-Ace Van Aircon Transport
    -Tour to Anawangin
    -Tour to Capones Island (depends upon weather condition)
    -Entrance Fee/Overnight Stay Fee
    -Boat Transfer
    -Bangkeros/Lifevest
    -Trekking to Hilltop ( Anawangin )
    -Trekking to Lighthouse or Capones Whitesand ( Capones )
    -Set of Bonfire
    -Tents
    -Cooler
    -Enough supply of ice
    -Charcoal (Uling for cooking)
    -Grill, Caserole, Laddle, Pitcher, Palayok, Chopping Board, Knife
    -Free Use of Camp Tables/ Chairs
    -Distilled Water
    -Free Drop By at Royal Subic Bay Duty Free

    Downpayment is 500 each only. The downpayment price is negotiable if you contact us after reading this: 09152487303. thank you! have a nice day ♥

  19. The place is isolated and incredibly picturesque. I strongly suggest you look for a coordinator so that they can arrange joiners for your trip. This will definitely lessen the expenses. Also, look for a package that provided you with kitchen wares and camping sets because food is very expensive on site. Budget tour starts at P499/pax min of 10. With van transfer starts at P1299/pax. We are direct operators/coordinator, affordable and they live on the place. Very accommodating and honest! Contact Andy or Shyne 09335227701 / 09778317973

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